U.S. Supreme Court

Lack of Lawyers Blocking Appeals in Capital Cases

Lack of Lawyers Blocking Appeals in Capital Cases NEW YORK TIMES

July 5, 2001

Lack of Lawyers Blocking Appeals in Capital Cases
By CRYSTAL NIX HINES

Dozens of inmates on death row lack lawyers for their appeals, in part because private law firms are increasingly unwilling to take on burdensome, expensive and emotionally wrenching capital cases, death penalty lawyers say.

A Supreme Court Ruling Roils Death Penalty Cases

A Supreme Court Ruling Roils Death Penalty Cases NEW YORK TIMES

September 16, 2002

A Supreme Court Ruling Roils Death Penalty Cases

By ADAM LIPTAK

Not long after the United States Supreme Court invalidated Arizona's death penalty statute in June and only a week before the Arizona Legislature enacted emergency legislation to reinstate it, two men accused of murder tried a bold legal maneuver that may save their lives. They pleaded guilty.

The prosecutor was surprised but candid: he said the men could plead

A Chance Reprieve, and Another Chance at Life

NYT-Cheever.html NEW YORK TIMES

June 29, 2002

A Chance Reprieve, and Another Chance at Life

By JOAN M. CHEEVER
op-ed

TAMFORD, Conn. — Thirty years ago today — June 29, 1972 — the Supreme Court ruled in Furman v. Georgia that the death penalty was unconstitutional because it was administered in a racially and geographically discriminatory manner. The decision ended up saving the lives of 611 inmates on death rows in 31 states. This week, in Ring v. Arizona, the court may have done the same for some of the 800 killers now housed on death rows in the nine

Public Defender, Attorney General Seek Statewide Freeze of Capital Cases

Public Defender, Attorney General Seek Statewide Freeze of Capital Cases New Jersey Law Journal

September 16, 2002

Public Defender, Attorney General Seek Statewide Freeze of Capital Cases:
Time needed to review effect of recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings

By MARY P. GALLAGHER

Bolstered by U.S. Supreme Court rulings that have placed death-penalty laws under new, enhanced scrutiny, New Jersey public defenders ó with support from prosecutors and the Attorney General's Office ó are seeking a statewide

A Basic Death Penalty Paradox that is Tearing the Supreme Court Apart

A BASIC DEATH PENALTY PARADOX THAT IS TEARING THE SUPREME COURT APART FINDLAW.Com
Legal Commentary

Thursday, Oct. 31, 2002

A Basic Death Penalty Paradox that is Tearing the Supreme Court Apart

By EDWARD LAZARUS*

Currently, in the Washington, D.C. area, prosecutors from Maryland, Virginia, and the federal government are competing for the privilege of being the first to seek the death penalty against the beltway snipers. As unseemly as these acts of political one-upsmanship may be, who can argue that the punishment does not fit the crime?

Arizona Should End Death Penalty

AR-NVeditorial Arizona Republic

July 28, 2002

Arizona should end death penalty
Old arguments for execution won't stand up against evidence of mistakes

Editorial

The constitutional defect the U.S. Supreme Court found in Arizona's death penalty last month is easily fixed.

Currently, judges decide whether there are aggravating circumstances that warrant, weighed against mitigating factors, death rather than life in prison.

Arizona law spells out the aggravating circumstances to be considered,

Supreme Court Intervenes in Death Penalty Cases

Supreme Court Intervenes in Death Penalty Cases

Editorial, Miami Herald, editorial
Feb. 7, 2002

On the weighty question of whether an execution passes constitutional muster, both advocates and foes of the death penalty are in rare agreement: Let the courts decide.

Thus Gov. Jeb Bush halted today's scheduled execution of Robert Trease shortly after the U.S. Supreme Court stopped the execution of another Florida inmate, Linroy Bottoson.

Both the Supreme Court and the governor made the right call. Gov. Bush, a strong supporter of capital punishment, said he made

U.S. Supreme Court: Miller-El v. Dretke

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