Clemency

Clemency Without Clarity

Clemency Without Clarity NEW YORK TIMES

January 17, 2003

Clemency Without Clarity

By SCOTT TUROW*

CHICAGO — Before he left office on Monday, Gov. George Ryan of Illinois, a longtime supporter of capital punishment, emptied the state's death row by pardoning four condemned men and commuting the sentences of the remaining 167 prisoners. Some are calling this an act of tremendous bravery, while prosecutors and the families of victims claim justice was thwarted. Many others believe he should have acted in the most questionable cases without

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Missteps On Road To Injustice

Missteps On Road To Injustice WASHINGTON POST

Friday , December 1, 2000
Page A01

Missteps On Road To Injustice

By BROOKE A. MASTERS
Washington Post Staff Writer

"Did you stab a woman in Culpeper?" the state police detective asked.

The illiterate farm worker nodded.

"Was this woman white or black?"

"Black."

A few questions later, Special Agent C. Reese Wilmore tried again. "Was she white or black?"

This time Earl Washington Jr. said, "White." That answer launched the

Ruling Could Force Florida to Commute Execution

Ruling could force Florida to commute execution

BY LESLEY CLARK
Miami Herald
Tue, Feb. 12, 2002

Some of Florida's most notorious murderers could see their sentences commuted to life in prison -- and many could even apply for parole -- depending on how the U.S. Supreme Court rules in a murder case out of Arizona. In its most far-reaching capital punishment case since the 1970s, the court will decide whether it is constitutional for a judge, rather than a jury, to sentence convicted killers to death. Judges make the final decisions in Florida, Arizona and seven other states.

Hangman, Be Gone

Hangman, Be Gone WASHINGTON POST

September 26, 2000
Thursday, Final Edition

Hangman, Be Gone

By RICHARD COHEN
OP-ED

The motto of the New York Times is "All the News That's Fit to Print." The other day, the paper ran a story showing that capital punishment is not a deterrent. This was certainly fit to print. It just was not news.

Who Gets the Death Penalty?

Who Gets the Death Penalty? NEW YORK TIMES

May 13, 2002

Who Gets the Death Penalty?

By BOB HERBERT

How's this for a mistake in a death penalty case?

Back in 1994 the Georgia State Board of Pardons and Paroles, in an official order denying a request for a stay of execution, somehow inserted the wrong man's name into a crucial paragraph. So instead of William Henry Hance, which was the name of the man seeking the stay, the order contained a reference to someone named Larry Grant Lonchar.

Georgia authorities did not consider that to be a big deal. Mistakes

A Chance Reprieve, and Another Chance at Life

NYT-Cheever.html NEW YORK TIMES

June 29, 2002

A Chance Reprieve, and Another Chance at Life

By JOAN M. CHEEVER
op-ed

TAMFORD, Conn. — Thirty years ago today — June 29, 1972 — the Supreme Court ruled in Furman v. Georgia that the death penalty was unconstitutional because it was administered in a racially and geographically discriminatory manner. The decision ended up saving the lives of 611 inmates on death rows in 31 states. This week, in Ring v. Arizona, the court may have done the same for some of the 800 killers now housed on death rows in the nine

Clemency

Since 1976, 288 death row prisoners have been granted clemency for humanitarian reasons. Humanitarian reasons include doubts about the defendant's guilt or judgments about the death penalty by the governor. The clemency process varies from state to state, typically involving the governor or a board of advisors, or both.

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