International

International Perspectives on the Death Penalty: A Costly Isolation for the U.S.

by Richard C. Dieter, Esq. Executive Director, Death Penalty Information Center October 1999

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Introduction

International Developments

When U.S. States Execute Citizens of Other Countries

When U.S. states execute citizens of other countries SOURCE

July 25, 2001

When U.S. states execute citizens of other countries
(source: Michael Dorf, Findlaw/CNN)

On July 20, Oklahoma Gov. Frank Keating denied Gerardo Valdez's plea that his death sentence be commuted to lifetime imprisonment. Gov. Keating's decision was surprising because in this case, unlike in most others, the Oklahoma Pardon and Parole Board had recommended clemency based on mitigating evidence that was not presented at Valdez's original trial. Moreover, in

Dead Reckoning

Death Trip: The American Way of Execution - Part I THE NATION

August 6, 2001

Dead Reckoning

by BRUCE SHAPIRO

Dinan, Brittany

This walled medieval city in France's ancient Breton heartland is the last place anyone would look for evidence of a coming transformation in US law. German and British tourists crowd the old stone streets and file through the twelfth-century Church of St. Saveur to gaze up at a stained-glass portrayal of St. Rocco dying in prison. The small Commissaire du Police

America's Deadly Image

America's Deadly Image WASHINGTON POST

February 20, 2001
Tuesday Edition, Page A23

America's Deadly Image

By FELIX G. ROHATYN*
OP-ED

A subject that is rarely noted today is the challenge to America's moral leadership in Europe. Most Frenchmen, as most Europeans, admire America. They admire what we do, what we stand for and what we have done for them twice in the 20th century. I have had the privilege of speaking on D-Day at the Normandy military cemeteries and seeing tens of thousands of Frenchmen

U.S. death penalty could prove hurdle to extradition of terror suspects from Britain

U.S. death penalty could prove hurdle to extradition of terror suspects from Britain
Associated Press
October 8, 2001

European human-rights legislation may hinder Britain from extraditing suspects in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks who could face the death penalty in the United States, a government official said Sunday. Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights bars Britain and the other signatories from extraditing prisoners if they could face capital punishment. There is no death penalty in any of the 15 member nations of the European Union.

World Court Should Hear Sept. 11 Case

World Court Should Hear Sept. 11 Case

Reuters
November 9, 2001

Former chief prosecutor for the U.N. war crimes tribunal Richard Goldstone said on Friday the perpetrators of the Sept. 11 attacks on America should be tried in an international court rather than on U.S. soil.

Goldstone, now a justice on South Africa's Constitutional Court, said the attack on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were crimes against humanity and should be prosecuted in an ad hoc international tribunal drawn up by the U.N. Security Council.

Statement of the Honorable William D. Delahunt in support of the Delahunt-Scott Amendment to The Terrorist Bombings Convention Implementation Act of 2001

Statement:Delahunt-Scott Amendment to Title 1 of H.R. 3275

U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on the Judiciary
Statement of the Honorable William D. Delahunt of Massachusetts

In Support of the Delahunt-Scott Amendment to Title 1 of H.R. 3275, The Terrorist Bombings Convention Implementation Act of 2001

November 15, 2001

Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.

Mr. Chairman, this amendment, in which I am joined by my good friend, the ranking member of the Crime Subcommittee

The US Death Penalty and International Law: US Compliance with the Torture and Race Conventions

 

 

Ford Foundation Symposium
November 12, 1998

by Richard C. Dieter, Esq. Executive Director, Death Penalty Information Center

Introduction

Pages