Juveniles

Recent Public Opinion on the Juvenile Death Penalty


NATIONAL POLLS
RETURN TO ROPER v. SIMMONS
STATE POLLS

NATIONAL POLLS

Polling Reveals Only a Minority of Americans Supports Execution of Juvenile Offenders
A series of public opinion polls reveals that only about a third of Americans support the death penalty as applied to

Juvenile Offenders Executed, by State, 1976-2005


JUVENILE OFFENDERS EXECUTED, BY STATE, 1976-2005

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International Perspectives on the Death Penalty: A Costly Isolation for the U.S.

by Richard C. Dieter, Esq. Executive Director, Death Penalty Information Center October 1999

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Introduction

International Developments

Whats New

DPIC-What's New  
 

Last updated January 24, 2003

 

Death Trip: The American Way of Execution (Part II)

Death Trip: The American Way of Execution - Part II THE NATION

January 8, 2001

Death Trip: The American Way of Execution

By ROBERT SHERILL

Part 2 of 2

The Supreme Court's Dismaying Muddle

From this day forward, I no longer shall tinker with the machinery of death. For more than 20 years I have endeavored...along with a majority of this Court, to develop procedural and substantive rules that would lend more than the mere appearance of fairness to the death penalty endeavor. Rather than continue to coddle the Court's delusion that the

Whether to Kill Those Who Killed as Youths

Whether to Kill Those Who Killed as Youths NEW YORK TIMES

August 22, 2000

YOUNG AND CONDEMNED / A SPECIAL REPORT
Whether to Kill Those Who Killed as Youths

By SARA RIMER and RAYMOND BONNER

If the state of Georgia electrocutes Alexander Williams on Thursday, as planned, five people who committed murder when they were 17 will have been put to death this year in the United States. That is more than in any year since 1954, when six teenagers were executed in Florida and Georgia.

Killing the Insane

Killing the Insane WASHINGTON POST

Wednesday, February 20, 2002
Page A14

Killing the Insane

EDITORIAL

IF THE STATE of Georgia has its way, Alexander Williams IV will soon be dead. Mr. Williams raped and murdered a teenage girl in 1986; his guilt is not seriously in doubt. Yet his execution would be barbarous. The reason is not just that Mr. Williams was 17 at the time of his crime, though the juvenile death penalty is a blight that should be ended. Mr. Williams also, in the words of prison doctors, suffers from "chronic paranoid schizophrenia,"

Seventeen an Awkward Age, N.H. Juvenile Justice Finds

Seventeen an Awkward Age, N.H. Juvenile Justice Finds WASHINGTON POST

Wednesday, March 27, 2002
Page A03

Seventeen an Awkward Age, N.H. Juvenile Justice Finds
In Reversal, State Moves to Raise Criminal Adulthood to 18

By PAMELA FERDINAND
Special to The Washington Post

BOSTON--The kid was a domestic terror. He beat his younger brother. He shoved his single mother down the stairs, and he put his fist through the doors and walls of their rented house in Concord, N.H. Last fall at school, he assaulted a student.

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