Juveniles

A Basic Death Penalty Paradox that is Tearing the Supreme Court Apart

A BASIC DEATH PENALTY PARADOX THAT IS TEARING THE SUPREME COURT APART FINDLAW.Com
Legal Commentary

Thursday, Oct. 31, 2002

A Basic Death Penalty Paradox that is Tearing the Supreme Court Apart

By EDWARD LAZARUS*

Currently, in the Washington, D.C. area, prosecutors from Maryland, Virginia, and the federal government are competing for the privilege of being the first to seek the death penalty against the beltway snipers. As unseemly as these acts of political one-upsmanship may be, who can argue that the punishment does not fit the crime?

Juvenile News and Developments - Previous Years

Juveniles and the Death Penalty

ROPER v. SIMMONS, No. 03-0633

In March 2005, the United States Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty for those who had committed their crimes at under 18 years of age was cruel and unusual punishment and hence barred by the Constitution. For more information, see: Roper v. Simmons Resource Page

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Juvenile Offenders on Death Row (1973-2005)

The Death Penalty for Juvenile Offenders was banned by the Supreme Court in 2005.  See the Roper v. Simmons Resource Page for more information about the case.

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Execution of Juveniles in the U.S. and other Countries

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