North Carolina

North Carolina

Chapter 2: A witness, a tangled web

'The truth as they knew it'
Joseph Neff, Staff Writer
December 9, 2002
The News and Observer

AULANDER -- In the months after Allen Ray Jenkins was murdered, 15-year-old Crystal Morris emerged as the star witness, the one who really knew what had happened inside Jenkins' house, and when.

But her story kept changing.

A Hertford High School dropout, Crystal was a regular visitor to Jenkins' house, where she hung out, drank and called him "Uncle Allen Ray."

Chapter 1: Who killed Allen Ray Jenkins?

State again tries Alan Gell for 1995 slaying. Gell's lawyers will use evidence withheld by prosecutors in his first trial.

Joseph Neff, Staff Writer
December 8, 2002
The News and Observer

WINDSOR -- On Monday, Alan Gell will go on trial a second time for the 1995 murder of retired truck driver Allen Ray Jenkins.

American Foreign Servicemen's brief regarding Mental Retardation and the Death Penalty

Brief No. 00-8727

IN THE
Supreme Court of the United States
OCTOBER TERM, 2000

ERNEST PAUL MCCARVER,
Petitioner,
v.
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA,
Respondent.

ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE
SUPREME COURT OF NORTH CAROLINA

BRIEF OF AMICI CURIAE DIPLOMATS MORTON ABRAMOWITZ, STEPHEN W. BOSWORTH, STUART E. EIZENSTAT, JOHN C. KORNBLUM, PHYLLIS E. OAKLEY, THOMAS R. PICKERING, FELIX G. ROHATYN, J. STAPLETON ROY, AND FRANK G. WISNER IN SUPPORT OF PETITIONER


STANLEY S. HERR
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF LAW
515 W. Lombard Street

Failure in Fairness

Failure in fairness The News and Observer
(Raleigh, NC)

September 23, 2000

Failure in fairness

EDITORIAL/OPINION

In recent years, the evidence has grown steadily in North Carolina and the nation that administration of the death penalty is seriously flawed. Indeed, after completing an intensive six-month study, The Charlotte Observer recently concluded that North Carolina's death penalty system "is so tainted with mistakes, unfairness and incompetence that it risks executing innocent people while sparing some of the most vicious killers."

Life Without Parole

Life Without Parole The News and Observer
(Raleigh, NC)

December 4, 2000
Monday, FINAL EDITION

Life Without Parole

By: JOETTE STEGER
EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A12

Regarding Charles L. Davenport's Nov. 24 Op-ed article "Moratorium zeal tortures the truth": Few people dispute Davenport's statement that "the state has a constitutional and moral obligation to protect its citizens." However, many people dispute the right of the state to protect its citizens through using the death penalty.

Criminal Injustice

Criminal Injustice Independent Weekly
(Durham) October 16, 2002

Criminal Injustice

By BOB BURTMAN

No one's surprised to find drug addicts, thieves and sex offenders in criminal courtrooms. Just not sitting in the defense counsel's chairs. But in North Carolina, those facing the death penalty have often been represented by lawyers with nasty legal troubles of their own--including drug addicts, thieves and sex offenders.

Douglas Osborne was appointed to handle the trial of capital defendant

Race and the Death Penalty in North Carolina

Race and the Death Penalty in North Carolina
An Empirical Analysis: 1993-1997

 

Principal Investigator
Dr. Isaac Unah

 

Principal Collaborator
Prof. Jack Boger Presented by The Common Sense Foundation North Carolina Council of Churches
April 16, 2001

 

 

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