DPIC News

INFORMATION ON THE CASE OF ABU-ALI ABDUR'RAHMAN

Tennessee Coalition to Abolish State Killing
P.O. Box 120552 Nashville, TN 37212 615-329-0048 e-mail: [email protected]

Information on the case of Abu-Ali Abdur'Rahman

On November 15th the Tennessee Coalition to Abolish State Killing co-sponsored an expert panel discussion at the University of Memphis entitled, "Executing the Mentally Ill." Attended by 174 people, the panel focused on three issues: how childhood abuse and brutalization at the hands of

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ILLINOIS COMMISSION ANNOUNCES NATION'S MOST COMPREHENSIVE DEATH PENALTY REVIEW

Illinois Press Release

ILLINOIS COMMISSION ANNOUNCES NATION'S MOST COMPREHENSIVE DEATH PENALTY REVIEW; RECOMMENDS SWEEPING CHANGES TO PROTECT INNOCENT, ENSURE FAIRNESS

Majority concludes that Abolition of the Death Penalty May Be the Best Solution

WASHINGTON, DC -- The 14-member Illinois Commission on Capital Punishment will join Republican Governor George Ryan today to release a series of 85 recommendations resulting from the nation's most thorough review of the death penalty. The Commission's sweeping reforms

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SANTA CLARA BOARD OF SUPERVISORS PASSES HISTORIC DEATH PENALTY MORATORIUM

Californians for a Moratorium on Executions 870 Market St. Suite 859 San Francisco, CA 94102 www.californiamoratorium.org

For Immediate Release October 30, 2001 For More Information: Ellen Kreitzberg, 408-554-4724 Terry McCaffrey, 408-257-4611

SANTA CLARA BOARD OF SUPERVISORS PASSES HISTORIC DEATH PENALTY MORATORIUM

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Ruling Could Force Florida to Commute Execution

Ruling could force Florida to commute execution

BY LESLEY CLARK
Miami Herald
Tue, Feb. 12, 2002

Some of Florida's most notorious murderers could see their sentences commuted to life in prison -- and many could even apply for parole -- depending on how the U.S. Supreme Court rules in a murder case out of Arizona. In its most far-reaching capital punishment case since the 1970s, the court will decide whether it is constitutional for a judge, rather than a jury, to sentence convicted killers to death. Judges make the final decisions in Florida, Arizona and seven other states.

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How DNA Became A Perfect Witness

HOW DNA BECAME A PERFECT WITNESS The Toronto Star

September 21, 2000

HOW DNA BECAME A PERFECT WITNESS

By HELEN O'NEILL

BURLINGTON, N.C. - Jennifer Thompson was the perfect student, perfect daughter, perfect homecoming queen. And when her perfect world was ripped apart, the petite blonde with the dark expressive eyes became something she could never have imagined:

The perfect witness.

Police had never seen a victim so composed, so determined, so sure.

Just hours after her ordeal, after a doctor swabbed her for semen samples

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Failure in Fairness

Failure in fairness The News and Observer
(Raleigh, NC)

September 23, 2000

Failure in fairness

EDITORIAL/OPINION

In recent years, the evidence has grown steadily in North Carolina and the nation that administration of the death penalty is seriously flawed. Indeed, after completing an intensive six-month study, The Charlotte Observer recently concluded that North Carolina's death penalty system "is so tainted with mistakes, unfairness and incompetence that it risks executing innocent people while sparing some of the most vicious killers."

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Hangman, Be Gone

Hangman, Be Gone WASHINGTON POST

September 26, 2000
Thursday, Final Edition

Hangman, Be Gone

By RICHARD COHEN
OP-ED

The motto of the New York Times is "All the News That's Fit to Print." The other day, the paper ran a story showing that capital punishment is not a deterrent. This was certainly fit to print. It just was not news.

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U.S. Death Penalty: Victims Seize the High Ground

U.S. Death Penalty: victims seize the high ground UNESCO COURIER

October, 2000

U.S. death penalty: victims seize the high ground

On the eve of the U.S. presidential elections, the death penalty - repudiated by almost all democratic nations - is notable only for its absence from debate. Abolitionists are changing their tactics to 'win over' a majority

By IVAN BRISCOE
UNESCO Courier Journalsist

Though the legal battle was arduous, Gary Gilmore eventually got what he had longed for on January 17, 1977. Tied by nylon rope to an office

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