DPIC News

Clinton Is Urged to Declare Moratorium on Federal Executions

Whether to Kill Those Who Killed as Youths NEW YORK TIMES

November 20, 2000

Clinton Is Urged to Declare Moratorium on Federal Executions

By RAYMOND BONNER

WASHINGTON, Nov. 20 — An array of religious, civil rights and political leaders are appealing to President Clinton to declare a moratorium on federal executions in the closing days of his presidency.

A letter delivered to the White House today and signed by 40 people, including the former White House counsel Lloyd N. Cutler and several other

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Clemency Without Clarity

Clemency Without Clarity NEW YORK TIMES

January 17, 2003

Clemency Without Clarity

By SCOTT TUROW*

CHICAGO — Before he left office on Monday, Gov. George Ryan of Illinois, a longtime supporter of capital punishment, emptied the state's death row by pardoning four condemned men and commuting the sentences of the remaining 167 prisoners. Some are calling this an act of tremendous bravery, while prosecutors and the families of victims claim justice was thwarted. Many others believe he should have acted in the most questionable cases without

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Missteps On Road To Injustice

Missteps On Road To Injustice WASHINGTON POST

Friday , December 1, 2000
Page A01

Missteps On Road To Injustice

By BROOKE A. MASTERS
Washington Post Staff Writer

"Did you stab a woman in Culpeper?" the state police detective asked.

The illiterate farm worker nodded.

"Was this woman white or black?"

"Black."

A few questions later, Special Agent C. Reese Wilmore tried again. "Was she white or black?"

This time Earl Washington Jr. said, "White." That answer launched the

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Death Row and DNA

Death Row and DNA WASHINGTON POST December 16, 2000
Saturday

Death Row and DNA

Editorial

Frank Lee Smith was sent to death row 15 years ago for the rape, beating and murder of an 8-year-old girl named Shandra Whitehead. He was convicted on the testimony of 3 witnesses. The strongest of these witnesses later recanted and said she was pressured by police to finger Mr. Smith. This week DNA testing cleared him. But the exonerated man will not join the growing list of wrongly condemned people belatedly released from death

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Killing the Insane

Killing the Insane WASHINGTON POST

Wednesday, February 20, 2002
Page A14

Killing the Insane

EDITORIAL

IF THE STATE of Georgia has its way, Alexander Williams IV will soon be dead. Mr. Williams raped and murdered a teenage girl in 1986; his guilt is not seriously in doubt. Yet his execution would be barbarous. The reason is not just that Mr. Williams was 17 at the time of his crime, though the juvenile death penalty is a blight that should be ended. Mr. Williams also, in the words of prison doctors, suffers from "chronic paranoid schizophrenia,"

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Reasonable Doubt and DNA

Reasonable Doubt and DNA WASHINGTON POST

September 7, 2000
Thursday, Final Edition

Reasonable Doubt and DNA

By TIM O'BRIEN*
OP-ED

My editors and I thought it was a good story: the black, one-eyed, homosexual rapist who claimed it was a case of mistaken identity. P.S.: He also walked with a limp.

The U.S. Supreme Court had agreed to review the case in its 1988 term, because it had raised an important constitutional question: Do the police have any obligation to preserve potentially exculpatory evidence?

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The Death Factory

The Death Factory NEW YORK TIMES

October 2, 2000

The Death Factory

By BOB HERBERT

By the end of the year Texas will likely have set a record for executing people. The number of inmates marched into the death chamber in Texas this year is expected to reach 40 by New Year's Eve. That would be the highest number of prisoners put to death by one state since officials began compiling death penalty statistics from across the country some 70 years ago.

The current record is also held by Texas, which executed 37 people in

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Argument Escalates on Executing Retarded

Argument Escalates on Executing Retarded NEW YORK TIMES

July 23, 2001

Argument Escalates on Executing Retarded

By RAYMOND BONNER

WASHINGTON, July 22 - Mario Marquez did not deny raping and murdering his 18-year-old wife and her 14-year-old niece, the crimes for which he was convicted in 1984 and executed 11 years later.

But on appeal, Mr. Marquez's lawyers presented evidence that he was mentally retarded and suffered from severe brain damage, the result of beatings by his father, with sticks, whips and clubs. When he was 25, Mr.

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Technical Errors Can Kill

Technical Errors Can Kill The National Law Journal

September 4, 2000

Technical Errors Can Kill

By JAMES LIEBMAN1, JEFF FAGAN and VALERIE WEST
Special to The National Law Journal

EARLIER THIS summer, we published a study of the death penalty in this country. Our findings were disturbing and have provoked strong reactions. Two months later, it is time to look at some of those reactions, clarify misunderstandings and underline our central claim that the death penalty system is deeply flawed.

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Dead Reckoning

Death Trip: The American Way of Execution - Part I THE NATION

August 6, 2001

Dead Reckoning

by BRUCE SHAPIRO

Dinan, Brittany

This walled medieval city in France's ancient Breton heartland is the last place anyone would look for evidence of a coming transformation in US law. German and British tourists crowd the old stone streets and file through the twelfth-century Church of St. Saveur to gaze up at a stained-glass portrayal of St. Rocco dying in prison. The small Commissaire du Police

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