DPIC News

More Death Penalty Doubts

More death-penalty doubts USA TODAY July 5, 2001

More death-penalty doubts
Editorial


If statistics are any indication, the system may well be allowing some innocent defendants to be executed.

— Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, July 2, 2001


O'Connor's insinuation — that the nation's legal system is actively killing innocent citizens — is supported by increasingly disturbing data. Since the death penalty was reinstated in 1973, 96 inmates sentenced to die have been freed from death row, 16 in just the past 30 months.

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Don't Give Him the Satisfaction

Don't Give Him the Satisfaction TIME MAGAZINE

April 22, 2001

Don't Give Him the Satisfaction

By MARGARET CARLSON

Last Thursday 250 victims of Timothy Mcveigh's bomb--some who survived the blast, others who lost loved ones to it--were granted their request to witness his execution on closed-circuit television. In announcing this departure from normal procedure, Attorney General John Ashcroft spoke of the need "to close this chapter in their lives" and emphasized "the magnitude of this case." (There are too many mourners, given the 168 killed,

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State's Record in Death Cases Cause for Study

State's record in death cases cause for study The Tallahassee Democrat

State's record in death cases cause for study

Editorial
December 14, 2001

If an automaker led the industry in recalls, then spun the bad news as proof of excellent self-regulation, consumers would be skeptical. The automaker might deserve kudos for its efforts to rectify problems, but the high recall rate still would indicate a serious problem. A responsible company would identify the deficiency before so many recalls were required.

That's why it's so difficult to understand the reasoning

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The Death Penalty's Other Victims

The death penalty's other victims Salon.Com

January 2, 2001
Tuesday

The death penalty's other victims

By DAVID LINDORFF

When prosecutors eliminate jurors opposed to capital punishment, they also weed out women and minorities and stack the deck against defendants.


Ellen Reasonover found out the hard way that no good deed goes unpunished. When the St. Louis resident approached police with information she thought might help them catch the killer of a gas- station attendant, they arrested

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My Brother's Guilt Became My Own

My Brother's Guilt Became My Own NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE

January 14, 2001

My Brother's Guilt Became My Own
I had always watched over him, but he got away from me.

By BILL BABBITT
AS TOLD TO GABRIELLE BANKS

In December 1980, I made the hardest decision of my life. I told the police I suspected my younger brother of murder. Manny had come to live with my wife, Linda, and me in Sacramento that September after being released from a mental institution. He had been suffering from post- traumatic symptoms

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The Death Capital: Exposing Texas' Unjust System

The Death Capital: Exposing Texas' Unjust System NEW YORK TIMES

October 16, 2000

The Death Capital: Exposing Texas' Unjust System

By BOB HERBERT

There's a new report out today on the death penalty in Texas.

It's a chilling report, and as I began reading an advance copy I couldn't help but think of the governor of Texas, a candidate for president of the United States, gloating on national television about executions still to come.

"Guess what?" said George W. Bush, whose home state is already the champion

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Justice O'Connor on Executions

Justice O'Connor on Executions NEW YORK TIMES

July 5, 2001

Justice O'Connor on Executions
Editorial

An anti-death-penalty activist could not have put it more pointedly: "If statistics are any indication, the system may well be allowing some innocent defendants to be executed." Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's remarkable statement on Monday to a group of women lawyers in Minnesota should further energize the nation's continuing re-examination of capital punishment. Justice O'Connor, whose support of the death penalty dates back to hey

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Mercury News' Series on California's Death Penalty

Mercury-Mintz.html Mercury News

Series on California's Death Penalty:

  • Death sentence reversals cast doubt on system

  • State, U.S. courts at odds on death penalty sentences

  • Under fire, court eases limits on presenting new evidence

  • Saturday, April 13, 2002

    Death sentence reversals cast doubt on system
    COURTROOM MISTAKES PUT EXECUTIONS ON HOLD

    By Howard Mintz

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    The Death Penalty's Cloudy Future

    The Death Penalty's Cloudy Future CBSNews.com

    April 26, 2002

    The Death Penalty's Cloudy Future
    By Andrew Cohn
    CBSNews.com Legal Analyst

    Just three days after the Supreme Court heard a death penalty case and scheduled another one for next term, and just one week after a landmark commission in Illinois released its ominous findings on how the penalty is meted out, a federal judge in New York threatened to declare the federal death penalty unconstitutional in general.

    Are these isolated and coincidental actions by unconnected jurists?

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    Justices to Review Death Penalty: Supreme Court Will Decide if Judge's Panel is Constitutional

    Justices to review death penalty

    By KAREN ABBOTT
    Rocky Mountain News
    January 12, 2002

    Justices to review death penalty--Supreme Court will decide if judge's panel is constitutional

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to review an Arizona death penalty case that could change Colorado's method of imposing death sentences. "It could eliminate the Colorado death penalty scheme," defense lawyer David Lane said.

    It also could spare the lives of 3 of the 6 men now on Colorado's death row.

    The issue before the U.S. Supreme Court is whether it

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