Justice Ginsburg Discusses Glossip Dissent

In an interview at Duke Law School, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg reflected on the past term at the U.S. Supreme Court. She discussed several landmark cases from the past year, including Glossip v. Gross, in which she joined Justice Stephen Breyer in a dissent that questioned the constitutionality of the death penalty. Ginsburg said she had waited to take such a stance on the death penalty because past justices, “took themselves out of the running,” when they did so, leaving, “no room for them to be persuasive with the other justices.” She reiterated many of the key points from the dissent, saying, “I think that [Breyer] pointed to evidence that has grown in quantity and in quality. He started out by pointing out that there were a hundred people who had been totally exonerated of the capital crime with which they were charged … so one thing is the mistakes that are possible in this system. The other is the quality of representation. Another is … yes there was racial disparity but even more geographical disparity. Most states in the union where the death penalty is theoretically on the books don’t have executions.” She also noted the growing isolation of the death penalty. “[L]ast year, I think 43 of the states of the United States had no executions, only seven did, and the executions that took place tended to be concentrated in certain counties in certain states. So the idea that luck of the draw, if you happened to commit a crime in one county in Louisiana, the chances that you would get the death penalty are very high. On the other hand, if you commit the same deed in Minnesota, the chances that you would get the death penalty are almost nil. So that was another one of the considerations that had become clear as the years went on.”

(S. Lachman and A. Alman, “Ruth Bader Ginsburg Reflects On A Polarizing Term One Month Out,” The Huffington Post, July 29, 2015.) See U.S. Supreme Court.