Entries tagged with “Jordan M. Steiker

Facts & Research

History of the Death Penalty

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United States Supreme Court

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Nov 01, 2016

BOOKS: Courting Death: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment”

Courting Death: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment by Harvard Law Professor Carol S. Steiker and University of Texas Law Professor Jordan M. Steiker exam­ines the U.S. Supreme Court’s exten­sive — and ulti­mate­ly failed — effort to reform and ratio­nal­ize the prac­tice of cap­i­tal pun­ish­ment in the United States through top-down, con­sti­tu­tion­al reg­u­la­tion.” The authors argue that sig­nif­i­cant con­sti­tu­tion­al flaws per­sist in the death penal­ty sys­tem despite the Court’s attempts to reg­u­late it, and present the case for its abo­li­tion in the near future.

Policy Issues

Arbitrariness

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Race

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Apr 14, 2023

LAW REVIEWS — Collection of Articles on the Death Penalty from Leading Scholars

The fol­low­ing law review arti­cles by sev­er­al key death penal­ty researchers were recent­ly pub­lished in 107 Cornell Law Review, No. 6, September, 2022. They cov­er a vari­ety of issues, such as the inter­play between race and cap­i­tal pun­ish­ment, the his­to­ry of the death penal­ty, the fed­er­al death penal­ty, sen­tenc­ing trends, and the fed­er­al court’s role in cap­i­tal punishment:

Policy Issues

Race

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History of the Death Penalty

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Feb 04, 2020

New Scholarship: Born in the Legacy of Discrimination, What Comes After Capital Punishment Goes?

As the death penal­ty con­tin­ues to wilt across the coun­try, what­ev­er peno­log­i­cal jus­ti­fi­ca­tion it once pur­port­ed­ly served is dying as well, say cap­i­tal pun­ish­ment schol­ars Carol Steiker and Jordan Steiker (pic­tured). In their new arti­cle The Rise, Fall, and Afterlife of the Death Penalty in the United States in the January 2020 Annual Review of Criminology, the Steikers exam­ine four cen­tral issues in the rise and fall of the death penal­ty in the United States and explore what an American crim­i­nal jus­tice sys­tem might look like after the punishment’s demise.