Entries tagged with “Kwame Ajamu

Policy Issues

Innocence

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Feb 19, 2021

National Geographic Publishes Feature Story on Innocence and the Death Penalty

For the first time in its his­to­ry, National Geographic mag­a­zine has tack­led the sub­ject of cap­i­tal pun­ish­ment. Sentenced to death, but inno­cent, a fea­ture sto­ry in the March 2021 issue of the mag­a­zine, chron­i­cles the sto­ries of fif­teen death-row exonerees and illu­mi­nates the per­va­sive issue of inno­cence and the death penal­ty in the United States. The arti­cle, released on the same day as the Death Penalty Information Center’s new report The Innocence Epidemic, uses DPIC data and com­pelling nar­ra­tive sto­ry­telling to show how the U.S. legal sys­tem fails inno­cent people,…

Policy Issues

Innocence

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May 12, 2020

Ohio Death Row Exonerees Reach $18 Million Settlement with City of Cleveland

The city of Cleveland will pay a record $18 mil­lion dol­lars to set­tle a civ­il rights law­suit by three for­mer death-row pris­on­ers who, as a result of police mis­con­duct, spent more than a com­bined 80 years impris­oned for a mur­der they did not com­mit. Kwame Ajamu (pic­tured, left), his broth­er Wiley Bridgeman (pic­tured, cen­ter), and Rickey Jackson (pic­tured, right) were con­vict­ed in 1975 of the rob­bery and mur­der of Harold Franks based on the coerced false tes­ti­mo­ny of a 12-year-old boy, Eddie Vernon. Police also fab­ri­cat­ed evi­dence and with­held evidence…

Policy Issues

Innocence

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Jan 06, 2021

Witness to Innocence Releases #ImLivingProof Video Series

Witness to Innocence, the nation­al orga­ni­za­tion of U.S. death-row exonerees, has released a series of short videos under the tag “#ImLivingProof,” fea­tur­ing the sto­ries of men and women who had been wrong­ful­ly con­vict­ed and sen­tenced to death. The series, pro­duced by film­mak­er Martin Schoeller with fund­ing from the Art for Justice Fund, attempts to per­son­al­ize the dan­gers of the death penal­ty by show­ing the pub­lic liv­ing proof that inno­cent peo­ple are sen­tenced to death.