Entries tagged with “Ramirez v. Collier

Facts & Research

Religion

,

United States Supreme Court

,

Nov 10, 2021

A Divided Supreme Court Appears Troubled by Texas Death Penalty Religious Freedom Case

The United States Supreme Court heard argu­ment November 9, 2021 to review Texas death-row pris­on­er John Henry Ramirezs claim that the state’s refusal to allow his pas­tor to lay hands” on him or pray audi­bly dur­ing his exe­cu­tion vio­lates the fed­er­al Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA) and his First Amendment right to the free exer­cise of reli­gion. The Court appeared trou­bled by Ramirez’s reli­gious free­dom claims, but some con­ser­v­a­tive jus­tices open­ly wor­ried that rul­ing for Ramirez (pic­tured) would open a flood­gate of last-minute exe­cu­tion-relat­ed lit­i­ga­tion at the Supreme…

Facts & Research

Religion

,

United States Supreme Court

,

Nov 15, 2021

Discussions With DPIC Podcast: The Becket Fund’s Daniel Chen on the Exercise of Religion in the Execution Chamber

In the November 2021 episode of Discussions with DPIC, Daniel Chen, coun­sel at the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, speaks with DPIC Executive Director Robert Dunham about the Supreme Court case Ramirez v. Collier and death-row pris­on­ers’ rights to reli­gious free­dom. John Ramirez has chal­lenged Texas’ restric­tions on audi­ble prayer and phys­i­cal touch by his spir­i­tu­al advi­sor dur­ing his exe­cu­tion. Allowing such pas­toral com­fort in the exe­cu­tion cham­ber, Chen says, is about fun­da­men­tal human dignity.”

Facts & Research

Religion

,

United States Supreme Court

,

Mar 25, 2022

Supreme Court Rules that Texas Must Allow Death-Row Prisoner’s Pastor to Touch and Pray Over Him During His Execution

On March 24, the U.S. Supreme Court reversed low­er court orders that had denied a Texas death-row prisoner’s request for his pas­tor to touch him and audi­bly pray dur­ing his exe­cu­tion. In rul­ing for John Henry Ramirez (pic­tured), the Court empha­sized Texas’ abil­i­ty to pre­vent any delay of his exe­cu­tion by sim­ply cre­at­ing rea­son­able pro­ce­dures to allow Ramirez the accom­mo­da­tions he seeks. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote the opin­ion of the court, joined by sev­en oth­er Justices. Justice Clarence Thomas was the lone dis­senter, char­ac­ter­iz­ing Ramirez’s pur­suit of post-con­vic­tion litigation…