Entries tagged with “Sheri Lynn Johnson

Policy Issues

Arbitrariness

,

Intellectual Disability

,

Juveniles

,

United States Supreme Court

,

Executions Overview

,

Dec 17, 2021

Right Too Soon” Study: One in Seven Prisoners Put to Death in U.S. Had Legal Issues that Make Their Executions Unconstitutional

At least one in sev­en death-row pris­on­ers put to death in the United States since exe­cu­tions resumed in 1977 had legal claims in their cas­es that would ren­der their exe­cu­tions uncon­sti­tu­tion­al, a new Cornell University Law School study shows.

Policy Issues

Intellectual Disability

,

United States Supreme Court

,

Oct 07, 2022

Atkins at 20: Assessing the Purported Ban on Executing Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

In its land­mark deci­sion in Atkins v. Virginia in 2002, the U.S. Supreme Court declared that the use of the death penal­ty against indi­vid­u­als with intel­lec­tu­al dis­abil­i­ty con­sti­tut­ed cru­el and unusu­al pun­ish­ment in vio­la­tion of the Eighth Amendment. Twenty years lat­er, how­ev­er, there is not just the risk, but the cer­tain­ty” that states con­tin­ue to sen­tence intel­lec­tu­al­ly dis­abled defen­dants to death, three legal schol­ars argue, and the fed­er­al courts are let­ting them get away with it.

Policy Issues

Arbitrariness

,

Race

,

Apr 14, 2023

LAW REVIEWS — Collection of Articles on the Death Penalty from Leading Scholars

The fol­low­ing law review arti­cles by sev­er­al key death penal­ty researchers were recent­ly pub­lished in 107 Cornell Law Review, No. 6, September, 2022. They cov­er a vari­ety of issues, such as the inter­play between race and cap­i­tal pun­ish­ment, the his­to­ry of the death penal­ty, the fed­er­al death penal­ty, sen­tenc­ing trends, and the fed­er­al court’s role in cap­i­tal punishment: