Federal Judge Calls Oklahoma Execution Plan Unrealistic

Twenty-one Oklahoma death row inmates, including three with upcoming execution dates, have filed suit against the state of Oklahoma challenging the state’s lethal injection protocol. At a hearing in the case on September 18, U.S. District Judge Stephen Friot urged the state to stay the executions, which are scheduled for November and December, saying, “It does not seem realistic to me that the steps that need to be taken can hardly be completed between now and then.” The inmates have asked that the state be prevented from executing them “using the drugs and procedures employed in the attempt to execute Clayton Lockett, or similarly untried, untested and unsound drugs and procedures.” The state is currently revising its protocol, but the director of the Department of Corrections has said he will need time to train his staff on the new protocol. Patti Ghezzi, an attorney representing the death row inmates, told the judge that the inmates seek a finding that Lockett’s execution violated the Eighth Amendment. “We do not want our plaintiffs to suffer the cruel and unusual punishment that Clayton Lockett suffered,” Ghezzi said.

(Z. Branstetter, “Federal judge urges state to delay executions,” Tulsa World, September 19, 2014). See Lethal Injection and Upcoming Executions.