Nebraska Attorney General Says Death Penalty in Limbo

Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning said executions in the state are unlikely to resume for at least another year because of the scarcity of lethal injection drugs. “Death row is sort of in limbo today,” he said, adding that efforts to find alternative drugs have been diverted due to other state concerns. Nebraska’s last execution was in 1997, by electrocution. The state’s execution protocol calls for use of sodium thiopental, which is no longer being manufactured for the U.S. Earlier, the state had obtained sodium thiopental from a distributor in India, but the drug expired this year. The Department of Corrections would have to rewrite its protocol to allow for different drugs. State Sen. Ernie Chambers said he would work to prevent such changes: “I would fight tooth and nail… against what Bruning is talking about.” Bruning, who is leaving office in two months, said it will be up to the new governor and attorney general to decide “if and when” they want to address the state’s death penalty.

(M. Stoddard, “Jon Bruning says other crises have ‘diverted’ state from resolving lethal injection problems,” Omaha World-Herald, October 28, 2014). See Lethal Injection and Death Penalty in Flux.